Posts by bobborries

    WOW this is hard, many wave shapes can sound different in many ways depending on what octave your in or filter modes you're using. I found these possible candidates for certain sounds I'm looking for.


    09 Acid

    13 Piano

    37 String

    47 Organ

    48 Organ

    49 Organ

    51 Bass

    52 String/Vocal

    54 Piano/String

    55 Piano

    56 Piano

    58 Bell

    59 Bass

    60 Bass

    61 FM

    62 FM

    63 FM

    64 FM/String

    Thank you Maarten for your amazing Snow editor, I’m using a iConnect4+ interface with a air iPad and works great. I don’t know if other editors have section presets, but this feature is genius and makes editing a joy. There are a couple of improvements I’d like to see, in the mod matrix section I’d like to see a numeric value on mod depth parameter and is there a way I could easily reset a fader to it’s default value or zero?

    I posted this in the feature requests thread so I won't repeat myself too much.


    Using sMexoscope and my ears, I couldn't see or hear any significant difference between the Octavius waves (at any octave) and the Virus classic saw. But playing around I found that some of the other wavetable oscillators were lovely, fat and rich sounding.


    Octavius looks like a useful wavetable, but I don't think it's emulating vintage oscillators - I'd expect radical differences in wave shapes. But I'm more than happy to be proved wrong if you can point out those differences.


    It sure looks like the MiniMoog Sawtooth to me, (is it a coincidence that the Mini had a 5 octave switch) by the way modulating the octavius table makes incredible sounding pads, classier than hypersaws.

    The Octavius Wavetable is comprised of 6 different Vintage Sawtooths, each one an octave above the next. The wavetable fades very smoothly from the lowest octave all the way up to 2' octave. I thought all the wavetables were based on sine harmonics, but this is not true. When it's index is modulated by an LFO, you get the most amazing pad sounds.


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    Below is a Sonogram of the swept wavetable, left to right is time, at the bottom is low frequencies and as you make your way to the top the frequencies go higher and higher. Sawtooths contain all harmonics so you see all harmonic bands at the beginning, the dark black line at the bottom (C1) indicates fundamental frequency of the perceived note, the lines get thinner the higher you go up, and the upper harmonics get fainter. At C2 the line is darkest, same for the rest, C3,C4,C5 and finally C6.


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    Other vintage Oscillators to try are Eat Pulse, a crazy PWM type sound and Filtered Sqr, a filtered square wave (TR-606?), there's others and I'll have a detailed PDF examining all the wavetables, as well as the spectral waveshapes coming soon.

    The Octavius Wavetable is comprised of 6 different Vintage Sawtooths, each one an octave above the next. The wavetable fades very smoothly from the lowest octave all the way up to 2' octave. I thought all the wavetables were based on sine harmonics, but this is not true. When it's index is modulated by an LFO, you get the most amazing pad sounds.


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    Below is a Sonogram of the swept wavetable, left to right is time, at the bottom is low frequencies and as you make your way to the top the frequencies go higher and higher. Sawtooths contain all harmonics so you see all harmonic bands at the beginning, the dark black line at the bottom (C1) indicates fundamental frequency of the perceived note, the lines get thinner the higher you go up, and the upper harmonics get fainter. At C2 the line is darkest, same for the rest, C3,C4,C5 and finally C6.


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    Other vintage Oscillators to try are Eat Pulse, a crazy PWM type sound and Filtered Sqr, a filtered square wave (TR-606?), there's others and I'll have a detailed PDF examining all the wavetables, as well as the spectral waveshapes coming soon.

    Very sneaky Access, you put quite a few vintage oscillators in the wavetables, being new to the Virus, Iv'e been looking at the waveforms in the wavetables and Octavius is a MiniMoog Sawtooth in 6 separate octaves. I'll be posting a complete guide to the wavetables soon.

    It all boils down to if it's possible with the hardware and how popular a request is. You can't ask for USB3 cause it's impossible to change the hardware.


    User samples are out of the equation, there's no sample RAM that I'm aware of. Can't do a third ADSR envelope, I don't know why, but it's been suggested for years and still no avail. I suppose it's too processor hungry to implement. It's a shame with all the possible modulation destinations we have now. Pulse width, waveshape, wavetable indexes, FM, 2nd filter, waveshaping distortion and thats not counting any FX.


    It also pertains to how popular a request is, if you see a request you like by all means post a reply. The more positive comments means Access will take notice.


    Then of course the developers will wage if a request is cool enough to bring real value to their baby. I came into virus recently and love they way it all sounds, I never used previous versions of the system, so I'm not aware of the advancements. Some things are annoying like the combined osc 1 & 2 volume balance, I'd love to modulate the volumes as separate volume destinations, but I think it would break older patches.


    All in all I really love my Virus, and I hate Analog modeling synths, any super radical changes would have to be built as an entirely new synth.

    By the way, if anyone is interested in building a guide with me about the different existing waveforms characteristics, just PM me.
    I got lost each time in the wavetables, and go back to the same all the time that I know. A guide could be a great experiment support ;).


    I'd be willing to help out, I'm a graphic artist and I get lost in the many waveshapes that are available. It would be a challange to descibe the waves and what they're best suited for. By the way, batman, you disabled the ability for you to recieve private messages.

    [quote='Ruari',index.php?page=Thread&postID=15498#post15498]Your thread got me thinking, so I started checking out a few different synths to see how much variation if any, could be seen between different synths from different manufacturers. I had a look at the simple sawtooth wave & four different manufacturers (2 hardware, 2 software) give four different results, filters fully open & resonance set to 0


    What waveforms go with what synth? I would love to know.

    I didn't make the spectral waveform chart, some dude named Wolfgang did, if you google "Virus Oscillator Waveshapes" you'll find the original.


    As far as where waveform 51 is, I heard a rumor it was confiscated and is being held at Area 51!


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    Let's keep in mind that spectral waveshapes are different from wavetable oscillators, spectral being single cycle sample loops and wavetables that have a list of waves that can scanned through in real time.


    I'll see if I can get waveform 51 posted soon, maybe I'll do some sound demos of the suggested wave shapes.


    [UPDATE]


    Here's Waveform 51, it sounds like it has bass piano harmonics.


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    The random source creates a random value each time a key is pressed, but each value is the same for each destination.


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    Could we add Multi random? Where each destination gets a separate random value.


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    Single random sounds good, but Multi random is good too, take a listen.


    Why do Vintage Polyphonic Synths sound so good?


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    If you play a chord each note is assigned to 3 monophonic voice cards, each card has minor differences in tuning, envelope times and LFO rates. This makes each note sound similar but not perfectly the same. This adds a huge difference to the sound depth and musically becomes warmer.


    It's exactly what happens to a string quartet when they play a chord, each person is slightly out of tune, the vibratos are different, they're sitting in different places. Humans aren't perfect and vintage synthesizers aren't either.


    Here's an example of a synth with no variation in voices...


    http://www.bobborries.com/Tutorials/OBperfect.mp3


    Here's the same ditty with Multiple randomization...


    http://www.bobborries.com/Tutorials/OBrandom.mp3


    OK, so I made this OB expander patch randomizing the following parameters...
    Osc1 Pitch
    Osc1 PW
    Osc2 Pitch
    Osc2 PW
    Filter1 Freq
    Filter1 Reso
    Filter1 Env Amt
    Filter2 Freq
    Filter2 Reso
    Filter2 Env Amt
    Filter Env Attack
    Filter Env Decay
    Amp Env Attack
    Amp Env Decay
    Amplitude
    Pan


    The problem is I used up all my LFO's set to S&H to get all these randomized, and it's only 3 values that are truly random. If there was multi random I could get the effect I want and use the LFO's for something else.


    I believe adding this modulation source would greatly expand the sound pallet of the Access Virus, and give it a better variance to ensemble sounds.

    You can use the spectral waves as an LFO and they sound great, but originally they were meant for the audio oscillators. What if we had some new spectral waves that are specially designed for the LFO. There are many useful waveshapes that can add more fun and liveliness to our music.


    Some are based with midi-tempo in mind, some are good for single cycle envelopes, others come from vintage gear and some from nature. They also sound great as oscillators in the audio range. These are just suggestions, of course, I bet Access could come up with a whole bunch of exciting wave shapes.


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    Below is a list of the currant spectral waves available for the LFOs.


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    [UPDATE] added waveform 51.

    I love the sound of the virus, but I wish I had more modulation sequences and event generators to create toe-tapping patterns that bubble and percolate.


    Split the 32 step arpeggiator into 2 separate 16 step arpeggiators, like this...


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    To make a Duo-phonic Arpeggiator or stereo Trance gate, you could also add a gate Source to the Envelopes and LFO Envelopes for rhythmic envelope gate sequences.


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    Having 2 Arp-to-Matrix sequencers for Lowpass Filter 1 and Highpass filter 2, you could create bandpass sequences that very in bandwidth. There's too many cool things you could do with this capability to list here, of course having 4 separate 32-step arpeggiators would be better.

    The access virus has the most flexible filters around, you can get the most vintage approximations that any synth can achieve, but what about the oscillators?


    Wouldn’t it be great to have the punchy in-your-face waveforms from the past? You could truly Imitate your favorite synth from yesteryear, imagine the possibilities of putting these waves through the sound palette of the Virus.


    Each instrument has radically different waveshapes, here are a few of the different tonalities out there.


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    (Waveforms were sampled raw without the filter)


    Here’s a list of some of the best examples of vintage gear, each with it’s own strengths and weaknesses to help create new sounds that echoes from the past.


    Mini Moog: Hands down the best sounding waveforms with very high fidelity.
    Arp 2600: Gentle strength
    Oberhiem SEM: High class velvet
    Prophet 5: Very popular Curtis chip
    Yamaha CS-80: This made Blade Runner sing
    Jupiter 8: Smooth as butter
    Korg PS-3100: Very distinctive sound
    Juno 6: Precise and Modern
    Atai 2600: The beginning of digital


    Real analog components can go out of tune over the years that significantly alters the wave shapes produced. An extra parameter that simulates out-of-calibration characteristics, such as transition artifacts on a triangle waves, sawtooth offsets and improper sine bias trims would be nice.